27 Oct 2023

Tourmaline: The Stone of Creativity

Tourmaline: The Stone of Creativity

Tourmaline, derived from the Singalese word ‘tourmali’ meaning stone with mixed colors, aptly refers to the stone’s unique ability to display multiple colors within a single stone. The tourmaline's ability to present in a range of colors makes it one of the most versatile and unique gemstones. 

The tourmaline stone is thought to encourage creativity, being used as a talisman for both artists and writers throughout history. 

Origins of The Tourmaline Stone

Tourmaline stones are found all around the world, with the largest deposits in Brazil and Africa. Unlike other gemstones, there is no one location in the world that yields the highest quality tourmaline stones, each geographic location yields both fine and lower-quality stones. 

Because tourmaline stones are primarily found in hard-rock deposits known as igneous and metamorphic rocks, they require blasting to retrieve the stone, making retrieving large specimens exceptionally challenging and rare. Tourmaline stones are formed in environments rich in liquid, which can oftentimes be seen within the stone in the form of inclusions. 

Tourmaline refers to a group of boron silicate minerals. This group of minerals share a common crystal structure and physical properties, however, they can vary greatly in chemical composition. This variance in chemical composition is what accounts for the tourmaline stone's wide range of colors, sometimes within the same stone.

Tourmaline: The October Birthstone and Metaphysical Properties

As the October birthstone, tourmaline offers individuals born in this month a remarkable array of colors to choose from. While opals were historically regarded as October’s birthstone, the modern list also recognizes tourmaline. Individuals born in the month of October can benefit from the balance and calmness this stone brings. As the “stone of creativity,” it is thought to provide inspiration, making it ideal for writers, artists, and other creative minds.

Tourmaline stones are known to possess strong metaphysical properties.  Each color of the tourmaline stone is associated with its own special power and meaning. Many wearers select a particular color of tourmaline stone based on the desired effects and intentions. Serenity, creativity, compassion, protection, strength, and passion can all be drawn from the tourmaline stone depending on its color.

Physical Qualities of Tourmaline

Tourmaline stones exhibit highly unique physical qualities, some of which are still a mystery. Tourmaline has the ability to become electrically charged when it is heated. As it cools off, the stone releases a positive charge at one end and a negative charge at the other, causing the stone to oscillate. This physical quality is known as pyro-electricity and has been used throughout history to serve a variety of purposes. For example, the Dutch referred to the tourmaline stone as “aschentrekker” and would heat the stone to draw up the ash from their meerschaum pipes. 

Indicolite Tourmaline and Diamond Earrings

Indicolite tourmaline and diamond earrings

Indicolite tourmaline, also called blue tourmaline, is the rarest color of tourmaline stone. What makes indicolite so uncommon and highly sought after is its striking color, which can range from blue to a beautifully deep indigo hue. While tourmaline stones are found globally, indicolite tourmaline is comparatively rare and challenging to find. Like many stones, the clarity, weight, and color of stone all play a role in its value. The deepest and most vividly colored indicolite stones are the most valuable.

Further distinguishing this rare variety of tourmaline from its counterparts, Indicolite Tourmaline has its own unique meanings and metaphysical properties. The indicolite tourmaline has been used as a lucky talisman by many groups throughout history. Like other blue stones, it can be a healing stone, promoting inner peace, empathy, and honesty. 

Our Indicolite Tourmaline and Diamond Earrings feature 28.15 carats of indicolite tourmaline highlighted by 2.71 carats of white diamond and 18K white gold. The stunning indicolite tourmaline stones have been expertly carved by Atelier Munsteiner to cast colorful light in dynamic shapes. This cutting edge design is befitting of the Tourmaline’s creative meaning, sure to catch the gaze of anyone with an artistic eye.

Watermelon Tourmaline Slice, Rubellite, and Demantoid Garnet Earrings

Watermelon tourmaline slice, rubellite, and demantoid garnet earrings

Watermelon Tourmaline

As the name would suggest, watermelon tourmaline is characterized by its pink or red center and green outer edge that unmistakably resembles a slice of watermelon. Often used in jewelry, watermelon tourmaline is considered to be both rare and valuable. Watermelon tourmaline tends to be cut in slices to accentuate its delightful likeness to a ripe slice of watermelon. The bi-colored nature of watermelon tourmaline occurs as a result of trace elements that have changed in concentration and composition throughout the gem's formation.

Believed to be a heart stone, watermelon tourmaline is thought to help calm and soothe emotions, unlocking the deepest parts of one’s heart. 

Rubellite 

Rubellite, often confused with ruby, is in actuality a transparent and deeply saturated red tourmaline stone. However, while all rubellites are red tourmaline, not all red tourmaline is rubellite. To be considered a true rubellite stone, the red tourmaline must be able to maintain its color in both natural and artificial light. Rubellite is among the most valuable members of the tourmaline family due to its rarity, vivid color, and beauty. 

Known as the stone of the perfected heart, rubellite is said to be connected to the heart chakra and the root chakra. This connection is thought to pave the way for love, reinvigorate passion, and strengthen loving commitments. 

Our Watermelon Tourmaline Slice, Rubellite, and Demantoid Garnet Earrings combine 24.50 carats of watermelon tourmaline with 5.19 carats of Atelier Munsteiner carved rubellite, 13.79 carats of cabochon cut rubellite, and 2.23 carats of demantoid garnet. By expertly pairing the rubellite with elegant slices of watermelon tourmaline, Ann Ziff draws out the richness of the pink-red hues within the watermelon tourmaline. 

Pink Spinel, Morganite, and Pink Tourmaline Earrings

pink spinel, morganite, and pink tourmaline earrings

Pink tourmaline can be found in a variety of hues ranging from pale light pink to bright hot pink. Lighter colored pink tourmaline has the ability to change color under bright artificial light, which is one of the many ways you can identify that the stone is genuine. Oftentimes confused with pink sapphire, it’s important to differentiate that pink sapphires belong to the corundum mineral family which is distinctly different from the family of crystalline boron silicates that form tourmalines.

Pink tourmaline is thought to reduce stress. For those who experience worry and anxiety, pink tourmaline is an excellent stone for soothing symptoms. Similar to rubellite, pink tourmaline works in harmony with the heart chakra to promote self-love and emotional well-being.

Our Pink Spinel, Morganite, and Pink Tourmaline Earrings feature 14.43 carats of pink tourmaline that have been expertly carved and polished by Atelier Munsteiner to reveal their incredible clarity and color. These pink tourmaline earrings pair 3.20 carats of pink spinel and 5.95 carats of morganite, allowing them to evoke brilliance, glamor, and sophistication.

South Sea Baroque Pearls and Blue Green Tourmaline Earrings

south sea baroque pearls and blue green tourmaline earrings

Blue green tourmaline is characterized by its striking and rare range of blue and green hues. It’s known for exhibiting a mesmerizing interplay of colors that transition from deep oceanic blues to vivid greens, oftentimes within the same crystal. The mixture of both blue and green within the same stone occurs as a result of varying mineral compositions within the crystal lattice. 

Aesthetically appealing and known for promoting calmness, creativity, and emotional balance, blue green tourmaline is among one of the most sought after gemstones for use in jewelry. 

Our South Sea Baroque Pearls and Blue Green Tourmaline Earrings effortlessly combine pearls from the sea with the oceanic hues of blue green tourmaline to create a set of earrings that evoke the beauty and magnificence of the sea. 

Opal, Diamond Slice & Paraiba Tourmaline Earrings

Opal, diamond slice, and paraiba tourmaline earrings

Of all of the tourmaline gemstone’s many varieties, by far the most prized is paraíba tourmaline. This extremely rare and valuable gemstone rose to its preeminent position in recent years. This crown jewel was only just discovered in 1989, ever since the revelation of its discovery, it has captivated the gemological world with its electric blue hue. Paraíba has not only secured its status atop all other varieties of tourmaline, this newcomer has ascended the ranks of the world of precious gemstones on the whole.  As one of the most highly sought-after gemstones in the world, fetches the prices to match.

Named for the Brazilian state in which it was discovered, paraíba tourmaline from this region remains most valuable, despite being found in other areas of the world since the new millennium. Deposits exist in Nigeria, Mozambique and additional areas of Brazil, however, paraíba tourmaline from Paraíba boasts a higher saturation in color. The signature hue is due to the presence of manganese, which adds a red cast to an overall blue coloring; and copper, which contributes to paraíba’s greenish coloring. Paraíba’s coloring is primarily on a spectrum from greenish blue to pure electric blue, increasing in value the closer a stone is to the pure blue end. 

An added element to the paraíba gemstone’s allure is its ability to fluoresce, glowing under UV light. It is also believed that paraíba’s enchanting glow extends to its wearer through its metaphysical powers. Thought to enhance creativity, confidence, determination and inspiration, wearing paraíba is a beautiful way to honor and energize your creative spirit as you set course for your dreams. 

These Opal, Diamond Slice & Paraíba Earrings are a tour-de-force as far as October birthstones are concerned, marrying both opal and tourmaline with luminous diamonds. Asymmetrical, yet elegantly balanced drops cascade down in pools of seafoam, drawing the eye through translucent diamond slices, into the intricate Atelier Munsteiner cut paraíba and offset by brilliant white Lightning Ridge Opal, glistening with iridescent flashes of every color of the rainbow. Diamond halos surround the opals and nimble diamond details link each stone to the next, tying this dazzling piece together. This design is both timeless and singularly unique, with the versatility to suit the most feminine formal attire, as well as casual looks that are modern and effortlessly chic.

Conclusion

October’s birthstone, tourmaline, stands out as a captivating and unique marvel. Available in a myriad of breathtaking colors, sometimes occurring within the same stone. Known as the stone of creativity, tourmaline stones are exceptionally powerful for creative thinkers and artists alike and have been worn by writers, artists, and even musicians throughout history. Beyond its creative powers, different colored tourmaline stones are thought to possess different meanings, allowing wearers of the stone to choose the benefits that they desire most. 

The tourmaline stone finds its ultimate expression in the exquisite jewelry pieces designed by Ann Ziff. From captivating indicolite earrings that showcase Atelier Munsteiner carvings to slices of watermelon tourmaline that display the distinctiveness of bi color tourmalines, each piece is a testament to the beauty and versatility of October’s birthstone.

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